Indigenization of Depression: Understanding Its Impression, Expression and Experiences Among Selected Indigenous Peoples (IPs) of Luzon, Philippines

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Authors: Alpha Cristina P. Bolinao & Rosalito De Guzman, University of Santo Tomas, Philippines
Email: Alphabolinao@yahoo.com
Published: August 4, 2017
https://doi.org/10.22492/ijpbs.3.1.03

Citation: Bolinao, A. C. P., & De Guzman, R. (2017). Indigenization of Depression: Understanding Its Impression, Expression and Experiences Among Selected Indigenous Peoples (IPs) of Luzon, Philippines. IAFOR Journal of Psychology & the Behavioral Sciences, 3(1). https://doi.org/10.22492/ijpbs.3.1.03


Abstract

Depression is an alarming psychological condition among indigenous peoples throughout the world. While ethnic minorities are identified as a population that is vulnerable to mental health problems, depressive disorders have significant cultural variation in clinical presentation. Using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), this study aims to understand how indigenous people experience the manifestation of their depressive symptoms, based on the context of their cultural knowledge. The central question that this phenomenological study purports to answer is: How do indigenous people collectively characterize their cultural understanding on the impression, expression and experiences of depression? Thus, this paper presents the results of a phenomenological analysis of the lived experiences of various ethnic groups from Cordillera and Sierra Madre mountains, namely the Aetas, Dumagats, and Igorots, and different tribal groups such as Kangkanaey, Bago, Ibaloi, Kiangan, and Aplai. A total of 15 elderly members representing each tribe were purposively selected to take part in the study; in-depth interviews, focus group discussions and story-telling were the methods used. The findings recommend an audible call for a culturally sensitive guided intervention for this special population that requires a holistic approach.

Keywords

depression, indigenization, indigenous peoples (IPs), phenomenology