A Perspective of Taiwanese Interns on Professional Skills and Psychological Preparation for Fieldwork in Criminal Justice Settings

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Authors:
Chu-chun Chen, Taoyuan District Prosecutor Office, Taiwan
Mei-hua Chien, National Chung Cheng University, Taiwan
Published: March 2016
https://doi.org/10.22492/ijpbs.2.1.01

Citation: Chen, C., & Chien, M. (2016). A Perspective of Taiwanese Interns on Professional Skills and Psychological Preparation for Fieldwork in Criminal Justice Settings. IAFOR Journal of Psychology & the Behavioral Sciences, 2(1). https://doi.org/10.22492/ijpbs.2.1.01


Abstract

Waiting for field placement is a process full of anxiety and uncertainty. However, relatively little research attention has been paid to this topic. The current study examined the unexplored area of psychological and intellectual preparation for upcoming fieldwork in criminal justice settings. The Delphi method was adopted to gather information regarding needed preparation before fieldwork from a panel of 40 Taiwanese interns in three rounds of questionnaires. The results identified more than 20 capacities needed for fieldwork in four groups of criminal justice agencies, and both Active Learning and Taking Responsibility were rated as the top priority capacities for the four groups of criminal justice agencies. The three most important forms of psychological preparation for the four groups of agencies included Understanding Types of Clients, Understanding Job Descriptions, and Being Active. Suggestions for future studies, theory building, and course design were addressed.

Keywords

capacities for fieldwork, psychological preparation for fieldwork, criminal justice