Do Newer Antidepressant Drugs Really Have Reduced Side Effects? Examining a Random “Real World” Sample of 300+ Receivers of Medications

10.22492.ijpbs.6.1.05

Author: Nicholas Norman Adams, Robert Gordon University, Scotland
Email: [email protected]
Published: December 12, 2020
https://doi.org/10.22492/ijpbs.6.1.05

Citation: Adams, N. N. (2020). Do Newer Antidepressant Drugs Really Have Reduced Side Effects? Examining a Random “Real World” Sample of 300+ Receivers of Medications, 6(1). IAFOR Journal of Psychology & the Behavioral Sciences, 6(1). https://doi.org/10.22492/ijpbs.6.1.05


Newer antidepressant drugs are frequently cited as having reduced side effect profiles to that of their older counterparts. However, recent studies have begun to dispute this claim, citing selective sampling, short clinical trials, and clinical trial environments as influencing reported outcomes. At present, little research on antidepressant side effects draws on RWD (Real-World Data). Despite this, interest in examining RWD samples for antidepressant drug side effects is increasing as of 2020. The reported study asked a random sample of 300+ individuals taking a variety of different antidepressant medications to complete online drug side effect self-report scales with previously high validity. Newer antidepressants belonging to the atypical antidepressant drug class were reported as having only slightly reduced side effects of weight gain compared with older SSRI-class medications. No reduced side effects of increased depression, anxiety, sexual dysfunction (SD), sleepiness, or suicidal ideation (SI) were found for the newer atypical-class medications vs older SSRI-class agents. Medication adherence did not differ significantly between SSRI and atypical classes. No evidence for reduced side effects was found for newer SSRI and atypical antidepressants vs older same-class drugs when comparing six new and old medications drawn from atypical and SSRI classes. However, atypical antidepressants were associated with increased use of adjunct medications to bolster primary treatment.

Abstract

antidepressant tolerability, non-clinical study, RWD (Real-World Data), Social P v, SSRI-atypical side effects comparison