Online Learning in the Era of COVID-19: Computer Anxiety and Mental Health Among College Students

10.22492.ijpbs.7.1.03

 

Authors:
Nahal Salimi, Northern Illinois University, USA
Bryan Gere, University of Maryland Eastern Shore, USA
Bridget Irioogbe, Northern Illinois University, USA
Email: [email protected]
https://doi.org/10.22492/ijpbs.7.1.03

Citation: Salimi, N., Gere, B., & Irioogbe, B. (2021). Online Learning in the Era of COVID-19: Computer Anxiety and Mental Health Among College Students. IAFOR Journal of Psychology & the Behavioral Sciences, 7(1). https://doi.org/10.22492/ijpbs.7.1.03


Abstract

The recent outbreak of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has brought significant changes to higher education. In response to the pandemic, many colleges, and universities around the world, especially in developed countries, are embracing online or distance education. Transitioning to online learning that involves the use of information technology such as the internet and digital platform for course delivery has increased dramatically (World Economic Forum, 2020). However, these sudden changes have left some to speculate that the shift to online learning will change students’ level of anxiety, stress, which could result in poor academic performance and low achievement of learning objectives. The purpose of this descriptive cross-sectional study is to investigate undergraduate and graduate students’ perceptions of their mental health and computer anxiety in the era of the COVID-19 pandemic. Descriptive statistics such as simple percentages and averages were calculated. Also, a one-way ANOVA was used for analyzing the collected data. Results indicate that general mental health was significantly correlated with computer anxiety. The results also indicate that computer anxiety and perceived stress predicted poor general health. Demographic factors, such as sex, and academic discipline were significant predictors of computer anxiety, but age was not a significant predictor of computer anxiety. Also, the results show that chronic physical disabilities are a significant predictor of computer anxiety, and overall mental health, however, the presence of learning disabilities was not a significant predictor of computer anxiety. Implications and considerations for future research are discussed.

Keywords

anxiety, stress, college students, COVID-19, mental health, online learning