Historically Black Colleges and Universities’ Mentorship of Health Profession Students: A Content Analysis Exploring the North Carolina Health Careers Access Program

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Authors:
Kaye Thompson-Rogers, North Carolina Central University, USA
Dannielle Joy Davis, Saint Louis University, USA
Denise Davis-Maye, Alabama State University, USA
Claudine Turner, Sisters of the Academy Institute, USA
Email: djdavis@slu.edu
Published: June 1, 2018
https://doi.org/10.22492/ije.6.2.02

Citation: Thompson-Rogers, K., Davis, D. J., Davis-Maye, D., & Turner, C. (2018). Historically Black Colleges and Universities' Mentorship of Health Profession Students: A Content Analysis Exploring the North Carolina Health Careers Access Program. IAFOR Journal of Education, 6(2). https://doi.org/10.22492/ije.6.2.02


Abstract

The medical profession, as well as allied health careers, in the United States continues to experience a lack of diversity in terms of the number of African Americans practicing in these fields. This work highlights a postsecondary program developed to increase the population of Black physicians and health care workers throughout the nation: the North Carolina Health Careers Access Program. Data from this study centers upon multi-year evaluation reports and journaling. Mentoring serves as the conceptual framework in interpreting content analysis of these reports and the current program director's reflective notes. Recommendations for practice center upon mentor training and cultivating stronger program mentoring relationships between students, faculty, and staff.

Keywords

mentoring, mentor model, HBCU, medical school admission, health careers